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Friday, March 24
 

9:30am

Complimentary Continental Breakfast
Friday March 24, 2017 9:30am - 10:00am
TBA

10:00am

Opening Remarks
Friday March 24, 2017 10:00am - 10:10am
TBA

10:10am

Advances in Basic and Clinical Immunology 2017 Can we Prevent Immune Mediated Diseases?

ABSTRACT
The field of basic and clinical immunology has made rapid progress in many areas over the past year and one area of highlight is the interaction between environmental factors including human behavior and immunity.  Recognition that genetic makeup, while vital, is no longer considered solely deterministic in evolution of many immune mediated immunoinflammatory diseases has opened new corridors of research and have introduced new preventive strategies.  Accordingly many IMIDS, now recognized as beginning their evolution in genetically predisposed individual’s years to decades before the onset of clinical disease are now considered as targets of not only for treatment but prevention. This presentation will focus on one example of an important IMID, namely rheumatoid arthritis, and briefly review data on diet, exercise and stress as co-factors and as potential behavioral interventions for prevention. Finally it will focus on recent advances in basic immunology by discussing potential tolerogenic strategies for disease modification and prevention.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  • Describe advances in defining the relationship between primary immunodeficiency states and autoimmunity 
  • Describe the immune pathogenesis of immune mediated adverse effects from new immunotherapies of cancer
  • Describe advances in molecular immunotherapeutics with potential for advancing to approval for the treatment of IMIDs 

Speakers
avatar for Leonard H. Calabrese, DO

Leonard H. Calabrese, DO

Professor of Medicine Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine Case Western Reserve University R.J. Fasenmyer Chair of Clinical Immunology Theodore F. Classen, DO Chair of Osteopathic Research and Education Vice Chairman, Department of Rheumatic and Immunologic Diseases


Friday March 24, 2017 10:10am - 10:55am
TBA 1

10:55am

Optimizing Gastroenterology - Rheumatology Care: Practical Implications of Comanaging Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Disease Cases
Given current knowledge regarding auto-immune inflammatory diseases, the many manifestations of these diseases, and the various organs affected, comanagement of IMIDs by various medical specialties is vital for optimal patient care. Leading faculty will share personal experience from their practice and case presentations to elucidate the successful Gastroenterology/Rheumatology comanagement of patients with IMIDs.

Speakers
avatar for Joseph F. Merola, MD, MMSc, FAAD, FACR

Joseph F. Merola, MD, MMSc, FAAD, FACR

Assistant Professor Harvard Medical School Dermatologist/Rheumatologist Brigham and Women’s Hospital
avatar for Adam S Cheifetz, MD

Adam S Cheifetz, MD

Director, Center for Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School


Friday March 24, 2017 10:55am - 11:40am
TBA

11:40am

Strategies in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Management: Integrating Evidence and Collaborative Care
ABSTRACT
Despite advances in the management of IBD, care remains suboptimal with some patients in the community undergoing colectomy without having ever received recommended biologic therapy. In addition, the extra-intestinal manifestations of IBD overlap with many with rheumatic and other related conditions, requiring coordinated and collaborative efforts across multiple disciplines and treatment settings. This session will focus on the use of combination therapy with biologics and immunosuppressants in reaching treatment targets in the IBD patient population. Further, current evidence and recommendations in the diagnosis, treatment, and therapeutic monitoring of IBD as well as practical strategies to coordinate care across academic/hospital-based and community gastroenterologists as well as related specialty disciplines, such as rheumatologists, will be explored.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • Integrate evidence-based diagnostic, treatment, and monitoring strategies for the management of patients with IBD
  • Describe the most recent data and recommendations surrounding the safety and efficacy of current and emerging biologic therapies and the importance of a treat-to-target approach in the management of IBD
  • Implement strategies to improve multidisciplinary and collaborative care efforts for the management of patients with IBD, including patients with extra-intestinal manifestations 

Speakers
avatar for Stephen B. Hanauer, MD

Stephen B. Hanauer, MD

Clifford Joseph Barborka Professor of Medicine Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Medical Director, Digestive Health Center
Stephen B. Hanauer is past President of the American College of Gastroenterology.  He completed a medical degree, with honors, at the University of Illinois in Chicago. His postdoctoral training included an internship and residency in internal medicine, as well as a fellowship in gastroenterology, at the University of Chicago.  He rose through academic ranks to become Professor of Medicine and subsequently was awarded the Joseph B... Read More →


Friday March 24, 2017 11:40am - 12:25pm
TBA 3

12:25pm

LUNCH Innovation Theater

(Non-CME) Complimentary lunch. Seating is limited. 


Friday March 24, 2017 12:25pm - 1:40pm
TBA

1:50pm

Update: Immune Related Adverse Events From Cancer Immunotherapy
ABSTRACT
The introduction of new immunotherapies for cancer have been described as one of the greatest advances in modern medicine over the past 5 years.  These therapies which exploit so called ‘immunologic check points’ release inherent brakes on adaptive immunity allowing for relatively specific and effective anti-tumoral responses.  These therapies are now clinically available in the community and being used for an increasing spectrum of malignancies including melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer, uroepithelial cancers and others.  Many additional drugs are currently in trial and will be likely to be seen in the near future.  Attendant to these therapies are a remarkable array of adverse events secondary to immune activation with varying degrees of target organ specificity. Most commonly these immune related adverse events (irAEs) involve skin, bowel, liver, lung endocrine organs as well as others.  Patients with pre-existing immunologic disease appear vulnerable.  Prompt recognition and therapy generally with glucocorticoids and even at times a second biologic are often required. It is imperative that physicians caring for immunologic disease become familiar with these irAEs and develop strategies to diagnose and manage with their oncologic colleagues. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • Describe the MOA of check point therapy for cancer and relate the emergence of irAEs as a bye product
  • Recognize and diagnose common irAEs as seen with currently available agents
  • Craft and apply rationale immunotherapy for the range of irAEs and work interprofessionally with oncologists to optimize therapy for cancer 

Speakers
avatar for Leonard H. Calabrese, DO

Leonard H. Calabrese, DO

Professor of Medicine Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine Case Western Reserve University R.J. Fasenmyer Chair of Clinical Immunology Theodore F. Classen, DO Chair of Osteopathic Research and Education Vice Chairman, Department of Rheumatic and Immunologic Diseases


Friday March 24, 2017 1:50pm - 2:35pm
TBA 4

2:35pm

Changing the Treatment Paradigm by Inhibiting Key Intracellular Pathways: A 3D View of Targeted Therapy for the Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis
ABSTRACT
Scientific breakthroughs over the past decade have led to a broader understanding of the pathophysiology of RA that have resulted in tremendous advances in treatment options such as conventional DMARDs, biological DMARDs and oral, small moleculeinhibitors of intracellular pathways . The revelation that numerous proinflammatory cytokines use the Janus Kinase (JAK) intracellular pathway for signal transduction has informed the development of JAK-inhibitors. This session will provide an understanding of the intracellular processes involved in cytokine signaling that results in the inflammation and tissue destruction found in RA and provides a foundation for optimizing the use of these agents. The evolution of treatment strategies, recommendations, and trial design to a focus on tight control using composite measures of disease activity and health-related quality of life with appropriate switching of agents to achieve and maintain patient function and disease remission will be explored. Lastly, tools to incorporate the patient perspective, improve adherence, and aid in the  long-term management of RA will be discussed.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • Describe the intracellular pathways underlying inflammatory pathology in rheumatoid arthritis
  • Review the interactions between proinflammatory cytokines and the Janus kinase signaling pathway in rheumatoid arthritis
  • Discuss available and emerging JAK inhibitor clinical trial data supporting their use in the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis
 

Speakers
avatar for Maria Greenwald, MD, FACR

Maria Greenwald, MD, FACR

Director, Desert Medical Advances
avatar for Gregg J. Silverman, MD

Gregg J. Silverman, MD

Professor of Medicine and Pathology, NYU School of Medicine, Alexandria Center for Life Science



Friday March 24, 2017 2:35pm - 3:35pm
TBA 5

3:35pm

Complimentary Refreshments
Friday March 24, 2017 3:35pm - 4:05pm
TBA

4:05pm

Keynote Presentation: Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Diseases Meet the Microbial World
ABSTRACT
No scientific discovery in the last decade has been more shocking than the realization of just how thoroughly our health depends upon the trillions of microbes that call our bodies home. And nowhere is this realization more clinically relevant than in diseases of the brain and body characterized by immune dysregulation and heightened inflammation.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • Cutting edge view of microbial human interactions that are increasingly implicated in autoimmune/inflammatory conditions
  • Evidence that the current epidemic of autoimmunity has arisen in large measure as a result of disruptions in ancient co-evolved relationships with the microbial world
  • Novel treatment implications of a human-microbial view of health and well-being 

Speakers
avatar for Charles L Raison, MD

Charles L Raison, MD

Mary Sue and Mike Shannon Chair for Healthy Minds, Children & Families and Professor School of Human Ecology Professor Department of Psychiatry School of Medicine and Public Health University of Wisconsin-Madison


Friday March 24, 2017 4:05pm - 5:05pm
TBA 6

5:05pm

 
Saturday, March 25
 

7:30am

Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall

Complimentary Breakfast for all attendees 


Saturday March 25, 2017 7:30am - 8:30am
TBA

8:30am

Morning Welcome
Saturday March 25, 2017 8:30am - 8:35am
TBA

8:35am

Oculus Virtual Reality View: New Biologics to Improve Outcomes and Quality of Life for Patients with Psoriatic Diseases: The THRIVE Initiative
ABSTRACT
In recent years, the need to improve the structure of psoriatic disease therapy, to define treatment goals, and to measure treatment outcomes by means of parameters of clinical severity and quality of life has intensified. Compared to traditional systemic treatments, current and emerging biologic agents offer the promise of improved disease management and potential reduction in associated comorbidities, along with new safety concerns in long-term psoriasis management. Today, advances in understanding psoriasis pathophysiology have led to a broad spectrum of anti-psoriatic agents, including small molecules and biologics. This session will explore the complexity of immune cell interactions and signaling mechanisms in psoriatic and other immune-related diseases as the basis for newest targeted treatment approaches, including mechanisms underlying itch (an important symptom affecting patient quality of life and work productivity), the role of inflammation in psoriatic and cardiovascular disease, and the mechanisms by which some targeted therapies provide more rapid responses and better patient outcomes. Further, important factors in patient quality of life and self-perception that can help clinicians differentiate among available treatment options will be discussed. Lastly, an individualized approach to psoriatic diseases will be considered that incorporates available targeted and biologic agents in the treatment plan based on existing comorbidities and patient-reported benefits.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • Review recent advances in the understanding of psoriatic disease pathophysiology
  • Explain the link between psoriatic diseases and cardiovascular disease and the rationale and evidence for screening and management of cardiovascular disease in patients with psoriatic diseases  
  • Describe the mechanisms of action of new and emerging biologics for psoriatic diseases and critically evaluate their efficacy/safety profile in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis and active psoriatic arthritis
  • Discuss the impact of approved and investigational biologics on kinetics of responses, patients’ symptoms, and quality of life, and how to individualize the management of psoriatic diseases based on these factors 

Speakers
avatar for Joel M. Gelfand, MD, MSCE

Joel M. Gelfand, MD, MSCE

Vice Chair of Clinical Research and Medical Director, Dermatology Clinical Studies Unit; Director, Psoriasis and Phototherapy Treatment Center; Senior Scholar, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Professor of Dermatology, Professor of Epidemiology
Dr. Gelfand is Associate Professor of Dermatology and Epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine. He is principal investigator of three large National Institutes of Health funded psoriasis projects: The Dermatology Clinical Effectiveness Research Network (DCERN) which evaluates the effectiveness of psoriasis treatments under real world conditions, the Incident Health Outcomes and Psoriasis Events (iHOPE... Read More →



Saturday March 25, 2017 8:35am - 9:35am
TBA

9:35am

Optimizing Gastroenterology - Dermatology Care: Practical Implications of Comanaging Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Disease Cases
Given current knowledge regarding auto-immune inflammatory diseases, the many manifestations of these diseases, and the various organs affected, comanagement of IMIDs by various medical specialties is vital for optimal patient care. Leading faculty will share personal experience from their practice and case presentations to elucidate the successful Gastroenterology/Dermatology comanagement of patients with IMIDs.

Speakers
avatar for Joseph F. Merola, MD, MMSc, FAAD, FACR

Joseph F. Merola, MD, MMSc, FAAD, FACR

Assistant Professor Harvard Medical School Dermatologist/Rheumatologist Brigham and Women’s Hospital
avatar for Adam S Cheifetz, MD

Adam S Cheifetz, MD

Director, Center for Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School


Saturday March 25, 2017 9:35am - 10:20am
TBA

10:20am

11:00am

Examining Biosimilars within the IMID Treatment Landscape
ABSTRACT
Immune-mediated inflammatory disease is one of the pivotal emerging fields for biosimilar development, with these agents offering potential reduced treatment costs, expanded market competition, and increased accessibility of medication.  Given the numerous potential biosimilars that could join the IMID treatment armamentarium, healthcare providers must be prepared to make informed clinical decisions regarding the safety and efficacy of these agents, based on available data. This session will focus on biosimilars and the complexities that surround their transition to clinical practice, navigating through the intricacies of biosimilar manufacturing, clinical profiles, divergence from reference products and generic formulations, and approval processes so that practitioners  may minimize errors in usage, discern the proper role for these emerging agents, and make the best informed clinical decisions for their IMID patients.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • Describe the anticipated impact of biosimilars on expenditures, accessibility, and outcomes for patients with IMIDs
  • Highlight key differences among generic, reference biologic, and biosimilar agents with regard to manufacturing processes, immunogenicity, dose equivalence, interchangeability, and evidence base
  • Identify biosimilar regulatory processes for prescribing, such as risk  

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Kay, MD

Jonathan Kay, MD

Physician, Division of Rheumatology, UMass Memorial Medical Center Professor of Medicine, Director of Clinical Research, Rheumatology, University of Massachusetts Medical School
Dr. Kay received his medical degree from the University of California School of Medicine in San Francisco, California. He then completed an internship and residency at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia and fellowships in rheumatology and immunology at The Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts. Dr. Kay is Professor of Medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical... Read More →


Saturday March 25, 2017 11:00am - 11:45am
TBA

11:45am

LUNCH Innovation Theater

(Non-CME) Complimentary lunch. Seating is limited. 


Saturday March 25, 2017 11:45am - 1:00pm
TBA

1:10pm

Integrating Care in Spondyloarthritis: Applying Diagnostic Tools and Current Evidence Across Disciplines
ABSTRACT
Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is one of the most common rheumatic diseases seen in clinical practice and consists of a group of several conditions that share clinical, radiologic, and genetic similarities. These include ankylosing spondylitis (AS), reactive arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and undifferentiated SpA.  Patients can be further classified into axial (axSpA), peripheral or extra-articular presentations. Delays in SpA diagnosis affect the prompt administration of effective treatments. This session will focus on the latest diagnostic tools; classification criteria; evidence-based, guideline-directed treatments; and long-term therapeutic monitoring in SpA. Strategies to address coordination across multiple disciplines to achieve individualized care of musculoskeletal and extra-articular manifestations of SpA will be explored. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • Utilize classification criteria, imaging techniques, and diagnostic tools to aid the timely and differential identification SpAs
  • Apply the latest clinical data on current and emerging therapies and treatment recommendations to personalized SpA management plans
  • Employ strategies to improve care coordination and multidisciplinary management of patients with musculoskeletal and extra-articular manifestations of SpA 

Speakers
avatar for Atul A. Deodhar, MD, MRCP, FACP, FACR

Atul A. Deodhar, MD, MRCP, FACP, FACR

Professor of Medicine, Medical Director, Rheumatology Clinic, Division of Arthritis & Rheumatic Diseases, Oregon Health & Science University


Saturday March 25, 2017 1:10pm - 1:55pm
TBA

1:55pm

A Contemporary Look at Methotrexate
This presentaiton will provide attendees with an updated look at methotrexate (MTX) outside of use in rheumatoid arthritis.  Dr. Merola will explore potential benefical effects on cardiovascular mortality, monitoring, vaccination strategies and other topics relevant to MTX use in clinical practice in 2017.

Speakers
avatar for Joseph F. Merola, MD, MMSc, FAAD, FACR

Joseph F. Merola, MD, MMSc, FAAD, FACR

Assistant Professor Harvard Medical School Dermatologist/Rheumatologist Brigham and Women’s Hospital


Saturday March 25, 2017 1:55pm - 2:40pm
TBA

2:40pm

3:20pm

Co-Chair Multidisciplinary Panel Clinical Trial vs. Real World: Therapeutic Approaches to Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Disease
ABSTRACT
Efficacy is the measurement of treatment benefit under ideal conditions, such as controlled clinical trial. Effectiveness is the measurement of treatment benefit under real world conditions. Safety is a critical issue and challenge to all prescribers of biologics particularly for events shared across diseases and drugs. Three of the nation’s leading IMID experts will share their experiences and expertise to discuss the effectiveness of treatment post-approval and implications for their respective specialties.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • Identify differences between and methods to optimize efficacy and effectiveness as demonstrated in clinical trials vs real world settings
  • Critically appraise the issue of HBV reactivation as a safety issue shared across IMIDS and specialties to examine lessons learned 
  • Compare IMID treatment algorithms in clinical practice between rheumatology, dermatology, and gastroenterology
 

Speakers
avatar for Leonard H. Calabrese, DO

Leonard H. Calabrese, DO

Professor of Medicine Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine Case Western Reserve University R.J. Fasenmyer Chair of Clinical Immunology Theodore F. Classen, DO Chair of Osteopathic Research and Education Vice Chairman, Department of Rheumatic and Immunologic Diseases
avatar for Stephen B. Hanauer, MD

Stephen B. Hanauer, MD

Clifford Joseph Barborka Professor of Medicine Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Medical Director, Digestive Health Center
Stephen B. Hanauer is past President of the American College of Gastroenterology.  He completed a medical degree, with honors, at the University of Illinois in Chicago. His postdoctoral training included an internship and residency in internal medicine, as well as a fellowship in gastroenterology, at the University of Chicago.  He rose through academic ranks to become Professor of Medicine and subsequently was awarded the Joseph B... Read More →
avatar for Joel M. Gelfand, MD, MSCE

Joel M. Gelfand, MD, MSCE

Vice Chair of Clinical Research and Medical Director, Dermatology Clinical Studies Unit; Director, Psoriasis and Phototherapy Treatment Center; Senior Scholar, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Professor of Dermatology, Professor of Epidemiology
Dr. Gelfand is Associate Professor of Dermatology and Epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine. He is principal investigator of three large National Institutes of Health funded psoriasis projects: The Dermatology Clinical Effectiveness Research Network (DCERN) which evaluates the effectiveness of psoriasis treatments under real world conditions, the Incident Health Outcomes and Psoriasis Events (iHOPE... Read More →


Saturday March 25, 2017 3:20pm - 4:05pm
TBA

4:05pm

Potential Role of Personalized Medicine in Autoimmune Disease
Personalized medicine seeks to provide “the right patient with the right drug at the right dose at the right time”. The potential role of personalized medicine now permeates current autoimmune disease research, advancing the development of novel, targeted agents and allowing for the specific selection of tailored therapy; thereby, reducing trial-and-error prescribing and optimizing patient outcomes. Dr. Cho will focus on the latest advances in research and practice, focusing on the utilization of targeted therapies within autoimmune disease treatment.

Speakers
avatar for Judy H. Cho, MD

Judy H. Cho, MD

Director, The Charles Bronfman Institute for Personalized Medicine Ward-Coleman Professor of Translational Genetics Professor, Department of Medicine and Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences Professor of Medicine, Gastroenterology Mount Sinai


Saturday March 25, 2017 4:05pm - 5:05pm
TBA

5:05pm

Exhibit Hall

Complimentary refreshments for all attendees. 


Saturday March 25, 2017 5:05pm - 6:35pm
TBA

6:20pm

DINNER Innovation Theater

(Non-CME) Complimentary dinner. Seating is limited. 


Saturday March 25, 2017 6:20pm - 7:35pm
TBA
 
Sunday, March 26
 

7:30am

Continental Breakfast

Complimentary Breakfast for all attendees 


Sunday March 26, 2017 7:30am - 8:30am
TBA

8:30am

Morning Welcome
Sunday March 26, 2017 8:30am - 8:35am
TBA

8:35am

Divide No More: Understanding and Capitalizing on the Overlap Between Inflammatory Disorders and Mental Health
ABSTRACT
Autoimmune disorders and mental health conditions share a lot in common at multiple levels. There are multiple ties that bind these two seemingly discreet disorders, including the fact that both have elements of chronic inflammation, HPA axis abnormalities, as well as altered parasympathetic – sympathetic imbalances. Clinicians who take care of patients with autoimmune disorders should be able to achieve superior results when they address the mind-body needs of their patients. This presentation will offer a combination of the scientific understanding of this overlap along with practical tips and tools as how to best serve the complex needs of these patients. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • Examine the overlap between chronic inflammatory disorders and mental health and the ties that bind them together
  • Offer practical tips and tools for clinicians to utilize in order to rapidly and effectively screen for mental health conditions in autoimmune disorders
  • Explore the data supporting 5 elements of wellness’ impact on mental wellness, physical wellness, and chronic pain 

Speakers
avatar for Saundra Jain, MA, PsyD, LPC

Saundra Jain, MA, PsyD, LPC

Adjunct Clinical Affiliate, School of Nursing The University of Texas Psychotherapist Private Practice
avatar for Rakesh Jain, MD, MPH

Rakesh Jain, MD, MPH

Clinical Professor, Department of Psychiatry Texas Tech Health Sciences Center School of Medicine Midland, Texas Psychiatrist Private Practice


Sunday March 26, 2017 8:35am - 9:20am
TBA

9:20am

Optimizing Rheumatology - Dermatology Care: Practical Implications of Comanaging Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Disease Cases
Given current knowledge regarding auto-immune inflammatory diseases, the many manifestations of these diseases, and the various organs affected, comanagement of IMIDs by various medical specialites is vital for optimal patient care.  Drs. Mody and Patel share personal experience from their practice and case presentations to elucidate the sucessful Rheumatology/Dermatology comanagement of patients with IMIDs.

Speakers
avatar for Mital Patel, MD

Mital Patel, MD

Instructor of Dermatology Harvard Medical School Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women’s Hospital Associate Physician Brigham and Women’s Dermatology Associations Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Dr. Mital Patel joined the Department of Dermatology at Brigham and Women's Hospital after completing a fellowship in Dermatology-Rheumatology at Brigham and Women's Hospital. Her clinical and research interests focus on autoimmune and autoinflammatory conditions. She currently leads a Hidradenitis Suppurativa and Neutrophilic Dermatosis clinic and will be starting a multi-disciplinary clinic with gastroenterology focusing on cutaneous... Read More →
avatar for Elinor A. Mody, MD

Elinor A. Mody, MD

Director, Women’s Orthopedic and Joint Disease Program Assistant Professor of Medicine Brigham and Women’s Hospital Assistant Professor Harvard Medical School


Sunday March 26, 2017 9:20am - 10:05am
TBA 2

10:05am

Emerging Therapies in Rheumatoid Arthritis
ABSTRACT
An early, aggressive approach to RA management is supported by long-term evidence which shows that newer and timely treatment strategies can halt progression and maintain disease remission, reduce adverse events and comorbidities, and improve patient function and quality-of-life. However, inadequate evaluation of patient disease status and improper sequencing of therapies may complicate early and aggressive clinical decision making. Patients often experience one or more inadequate responses to treatment, requiring DMARD or biologic switching, especially among patients with long-standing RA and concurrent diseases representing an area of great need. Thus, new agents are being developed and the number of available treatment options is vastly increasing, further widening gaps in knowledge related to new clinical data. This session will focus on new and emerging therapies in the management of RA including the pathophysiologic rationale for therapies that target small molecule and intracellular signaling pathways. Further, as these agents can differ substantially in their selectivity, potentially influencing efficacy and side effects, this session will explore the clinical profiles of new and emerging agents, including their mechanism of action, safety and efficacy, and their appropriate use within the RA patient population. Lastly, participants integrate these data into informed treatment decisions and will engage in developing evidence-based and individualized management strategies to achieve RA remission.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • Describe the pathophysiology of RA and rationale for small molecule and intracellular signaling targets
  • Explain the mechanism-of-action, safety, efficacy and potential evidence-based role of newer and emerging therapies, including JAK inhibitors, within the management of RA
  • Apply clinical data of newer and emerging therapies as well as available standardized assessment tools to informed step-up and therapeutic sequencing decisions
  • Develop timely and aggressive management strategies for RA remission that are evidence-based and incorporate individual patient goals and preferences 

Speakers
avatar for Stanley Cohen, MD

Stanley Cohen, MD

Medical Director, Metroplex Clinical Research Center, Clinical Professor of Internal Medicine, UT Southwestern School of Medicine


Sunday March 26, 2017 10:05am - 11:05am
TBA

11:05am

BRUNCH Innovation Theater

(Non-CME) Complimentary lunch. Seating is limited. 


Sunday March 26, 2017 11:05am - 12:20pm
TBA

12:30pm

Therapeutic Drug Monitoring in IMIDs: Biologic Agents
Numerous factors have been identified that impact upon pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic effects of drugs used to treat IMIDs, including immunosuppressive and biologic therapies.
Therapeutic drug monitoring has been utilized to rationalize approaches to loss of response and are increasing used, proactively, to maintain response to conventional and biologic therapy. Examples of the role of TDM will be discussed as a means to both treat to target and personalize therapies in IMIDs.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen B. Hanauer, MD

Stephen B. Hanauer, MD

Clifford Joseph Barborka Professor of Medicine Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Medical Director, Digestive Health Center
Stephen B. Hanauer is past President of the American College of Gastroenterology.  He completed a medical degree, with honors, at the University of Illinois in Chicago. His postdoctoral training included an internship and residency in internal medicine, as well as a fellowship in gastroenterology, at the University of Chicago.  He rose through academic ranks to become Professor of Medicine and subsequently was awarded the Joseph B... Read More →


Sunday March 26, 2017 12:30pm - 1:15pm
TBA

1:15pm

Exploring the Role of Value-based Care in Immune-mediated Inflammatory Diseases
As many as 50 million Americans are affected by autoimmune disorders.  Many of which affect multiple systems of the body, complicating diagnosis and management, and necessitating consultation and coordination across different specialties. Additionally, with a wide variety of treatment options currently available and more in the pipeline, payers are faced with the challenge of identifying the most clinically and economically effective treatments options. Value-based care is emerging as a solution to address these rising health care costs, offering improved access and clinically effective therapeutic strategies for patients.   Explore how value-based care models are evolving and changing the face of future healthcare.

Speakers
avatar for Sherine E. Gabriel, MD, MSc

Sherine E. Gabriel, MD, MSc

Dean, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School CEO, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical Group


Sunday March 26, 2017 1:15pm - 2:00pm
TBA

2:00pm

Closing Remarks
Sunday March 26, 2017 2:00pm - 2:10pm
TBA